Artiklar

  • Hurry Up Harry part 3

    26 apr 2014, 04:50 av Hoxerijo

    HURRY UP HARRY PART 3




    The lossless version of Hurry Up Harry part 3 is available here:
    BANDCAMP

    FREE DOWNLOADS:
    BITTORRENT
    JAMENDO

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    HOX VOX FACEBOOK PAGEHOX VOX WEBSITE
  • New release: SUFFER

    29 dec 2013, 09:25 av Hoxerijo

    SUFFER



    New record feeding a cynic analysis about a difficult love matter, without romance or rethoric.


    The lossless version of Suffer is available here:
    BANDCAMP

    FREE DOWNLOADS:
    BITTORRENT

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    HOX VOX FACEBOOK PAGEHOX VOX WEBSITE
  • The Carnival of Animals and Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs, new Hox Vox releases.

    8 dec 2012, 10:26 av Hoxerijo

    THE CARNIVAL OF ANIMALS



    It's a re-arrangement of "The Carnival of the Animals" by Camille Saint-Saëns, in Hox Vox style.


    FREE DOWNLOADS:

    BANDCAMP
    JAMENDO
    BITTORRENT

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    MASLOW'S HIERARCHY OF NEEDS



    Maslow’s hierarchy of needs is a theory in psychology, proposed by Abraham Maslow in his 1943 paper “A Theory of Human Motivation.” Maslow subsequently extended the idea to include his observations of humans’ innate curiosity. His theories parallel many other theories of human developmental psychology, all of which focus on describing the stages of growth in humans. Maslow use the terms Physiological, Safety, Belongingness and Love, Esteem, and Self-Actualization needs to describe the pattern that human motivations generally move through.


    FREE DOWNLOADS:

    BANDCAMP
    JAMENDO
    BITTORRENT

    HOX VOX FACEBOOK PAGEHOX VOX WEBSITE
  • Harry Up Harry part II - New step in a druggy saga

    15 feb 2012, 23:39 av Hoxerijo



    It's the second episode in Hurry Up Harry trilogy, where it’s depicted Harry’s slow decline on a bad use of his bright mind, and the slow passage from being creative to self-harming.

    As stated on cover it's a breakbeat / progressive project, this time is more biased towards the progressive rock, plus elements of world music (mostly far east), post-rock, contemporary and reggae/dub.

    Hurry Up Harry is in memory of Marco Bianchi, drummer of Death in Venice.


    FREE DOWNLOADS:

    BANDCAMP
    JAMENDO
    BITTORRENT

    FULL RECORD ON YOUTUBE PLAYLISTHOX VOX WEBSITE
  • The Wreck Up (prog/psych/fusion) - Wreck UP EP

    17 nov 2011, 09:08 av Hoxerijo


    TAGS: jam rock, progressive rock, art rock, psychedelia, funky, fusion

    The Wreck Up is a duo whose members are David Preston (guitar in Res Band) and Hox (vocals, bass and keys player in Hox Vox, Turbogrind Terrorizers, The Blasted Muffins).

    First effort is Wreck Up EP, a 5 tracks EP floating among progressive rock, psychedelia, jam rock and fusion, released on 17th november 2011.


    FREE DOWNLOADS:

    BANDCAMP - BITTORRENT
  • Turbogrind Terrorizers - industrial/cybergrind - first album

    3 jul 2011, 00:06 av Hoxerijo


    TAGS: cybergrind, grindcore, avantgrind, industrial, experimental

    Turbogrind Terrorizers are a cybergrind political/satirical band from Venice, Italy. Formed in 2011, they started as a side project by Gianluca Missero a.k.a. Hox of Hox Vox, then right after first single Turbogrind Terrorizers entered the band Jason Kavanagh (also in awaycaboose and Cavity Pitch), Vince Gauthier (a.k.a. Corroded Master) and Neil Morrison.
    They release records in cooperation with itsu jitsu netlabel.

    The Album is first full-lenght, released on 28th august 2011.



    FREE DOWNLOADS:

    BANDCAMP
    BITTORRENT
    JAMENDO

    FULL RECORD ON YOUTUBE PLAYLISTTURBOGRIND TERRORIZERS @ ITSU JITSU NETLABEL
  • New Hox Vox album: Il Cavallo Spaiato

    27 apr 2011, 23:54 av Hoxerijo



    Il Cavallo Spaiato is about schizophrenia, music is quite lunatic and moves continuously from avant-prog to glitch/jungle/hardtek, like two clashing identities in same body.

    Song Flipback is inspired by italian showgirl (and icon) Raffaella Carrà and her far above-the-mainstream songs, particularly "Ma Che Musica Maestro". Of course results are less commercial.
    I also made a bebop/avant rework on Jeux d'Eau by Maurice Ravel.


    FREE DOWNLOADS:

    BANDCAMP
    JAMENDO
    BITTORRENT

    FULL RECORD ON YOUTUBE PLAYLISTHOX VOX WEBSITE
  • My favourite guitar songs

    11 mar 2010, 13:45 av doyouwannarock7

    1) Get Back - The Beatles - Let It Be(1969)
    2) Rock and Roll - Led Zeppelin - (1971)-
    3) Fire - Jimi Hendrix - Are You Experienced? (1967)
    4) Living Loving Maid (She's Just A Woman) - Led Zeppelin II (1969)
    5) Settle For A Draw - Arctic Monkeys - When The Sun Goes Down (Single)(2005)
    6) What Is And What Should Never Be - Led Zeppelin - Led Zeppelin II (1969)
    7) (I Can't Get No) Satisfaction - Rolling Stones - Out Of Our Heads (1965)
    8) Help! - The Beatles - Help! (1965)
    9) Take It Or Leave It - The Strokes - Is This It (2001)
    10) Joker And The Thief - Wolfmother - Wolfmother (2005)

    PS: go to hell, Jimmy Page.
    PS 2: this is 100% the moment, this list always changes.
  • The Beatles Timeline 1962-1966

    26 feb 2009, 19:01 av RadioheadOasis

    The Beatles Timeline 1962-1966

    1962- The Beatles were the first Liverpool band to get a major record deal

    The Beatles release "Love Me Do" rose to #17 on the UK charts during the autumn on 1962 and is Merseybeat first chart hit.

    The Beatles early sound unlike typical rock and roll, Merseybeat was more likely to incorporate secondary harmony, especially in the middle eight. Example "Love Me Do" suggests folk or skiffle more than rock ‘n’ roll

    Prior to the Beatles' success, northern groups had had no success breaking into the British record business

    The Beatles record "Please Please Me" Right from its very first bars, the song burst with a dynamism that was not just unheard of in British rock & roll, but had rarely been heard in rock music of any sort. Already showing quirky chord changes Critic Roy Carr went as far as to proclaim that "Please Please Me" "was the prototype for the next five years of British music.

    1963-

    The Beatles record the album Please Please Me. An album that broke the Merseybeat sound around Britain and it's first number one album. An
    surprising harmonies, melodic progressions, hard-driving rock & roll, Twist and Shout," the most famous single take in rock history. The album remains number one until it is replaced by their own With The Beatles.

    "Twist and Shout"- With it's clanging guitar sound and pounding drums was the hardest track recorded in Britain at that point. Beatles historian Mark Lewisohn calls it "arguably the most stunning rock and roll vocal performance of all time; two-and-a-half minutes of Lennon shredding his vocal chords to bits."

    "There's a Place"- Uncommon song topic The subject matter anticipates the Beach Boys' "In My Room," which was recorded five months later, though there is no reason to think that its authors, Brian Wilson and Gary Usher, got a chance to hear "There's a Place" before writing it.

    "From Me to You"- In one of many examples of the pair's flair for alternating major and minor chords and keys in captivating ways. That's especially apparent at the beginning of the bridge, in which the song leaps to a totally unexpected and thrillingly different key;

    "I Want to Hold Your Hand"- The song that basically started the British Invasion. The first self penned song to top the American charts by a British Rock Act. The guitar organ like sounds on John Lennon rhythm was achieved by extreme compression. They would experiment more on organ like guitar sounds in years to follow.

    The Beatles release "With the Beatles". An album highly influenced by Motown, sophisticated series of chords, melodies, and harmonies.

    "Not a Second Time"- The unusual chord changes are almost jazz in their nature (though the rhythm and backing are pure rock. One of the first serious appreciative musical criticism in rock William Mann of The Times in London."

    "It Won't Be Long"- A song with chords and harmonies that reaches far beyond standard rock and soul progressions of the time.

    1964-

    The Beatles, Meet the Beatles (1964, Capitol).
    The one record that more than any other awakened young American folk musicians to the possibilities of electric rock music.

    The British Invasion Starts, The Beatles' success, had begun to open the U.S. market for fellow Brits like the Rolling Stones, the Animals, and the Kinks, and inspired young American groups like the Beau Brummels, Lovin' Spoonful, and others to mount a challenge of their own with self-penned material that owed a great debt to Lennon-McCartney.

    The Beatles release CAN'T BUY ME LOVE and this becomes the first major pop hit Rickenbacker electric 12-String Guitar that would influence countless guitarists.

    APRIL 6
    BILLBOARD CHARTS - Places Beatles songs in top five slots:
    1) CAN'T BUY ME LOVE
    2) TWIST AND SHOUT
    3) SHE LOVES YOU
    4) I WANT TO HOLD YOUR HAND
    5) PLEASE PLEASE ME

    The Beatles release the song “A Hard Day’s Night,” features an opening chord so revolutionary that people are still trying to figure out. "A Hard Day's Night" Starts with 12-string guitar chord that opens "A Hard Day's Night or the George Harrison chord. The song has the unison imaginative keyboards by producer George Martin and 12 string guitar solo, and the fade closed on a series of an eerie unaccompanied circular 12-string guitar notes by Harrison that would be similar in the future style of Roger McGuinn.

    The Beatles release the album "A Hard Day's Night" The Beatles first all original album of songs with it's jangly guitars influenced such future genres power pop, jangle pop, electric 12 string rock, and folk rock. George Harrison's resonant 12-string electric guitar leads were hugely influential; the movie helped persuade the Byrds, then folksingers, to plunge all out into rock & roll.

    "Things We Said Today"- Introduced by and speckled with rapidly strummed triplets of acoustic guitar chords, it is also one of their folkier early outings, and if only in hindsight waved somewhat in the direction of folk-rock. Minor-keyed sad melodies set the tone in the verses, brightened briefly by a couple of lines which move up to sunnier climes, and then dip down again into melancholy territory. The group's genius for contrasting moods in their verses and bridges blooms especially strongly in "Things We Said Today," as the main body of the song segues into a bridge with a far brighter and more uplifting melody. All Music Guide Review

    "I Call Your Name"- An early rock attempt to introduce ska The song's midsection is the Beatles' first attempt to introduce ska (which was then known as "bluebeat" and later "Reggae") to European and American audiences. The change of signature and a middle 8 guitar melody not related, derivative or variation of the main melody is one of many progressive aspects in this early 1964 song.

    "I Feel Fine"- Rock music first major hit with intentional guitar feedback and it's first song that uses it as recording effect or intentional to be part of a composition on record. Feedback was so common on stage unintentionally that someone had to start using it creatively The song starts with feedback distortion on an acoustic guitar, followed by a riff-driven guitar song.

    Typical of the Beatles "Pop-R&B" synthesis Verse follows blues progressions, uses blues flats etc., but chorus/refrain shifts gears: new chords introduced, level of rhythmic activity changes

    "She's a Woman"- Some consider "She's A Woman" an important early Ska song, due to its heavy accented back-beat, or a rare Beatles stab at "garage rock," due to its rough nature
    and three-chord structure.

    The Beatles release Beatles For Sale considered by many the Beatles worst album. It resembles “A Hard Day’s Night” in it's acoustic based rhythm guitars with jangly guitars. However it’s important as it brings rock music closer to folk rock in songs like “I’m A Loser” and country rock “I Don’t Want to Spoil The Party. The opening three songs, along with "I Don't Want to Spoil the Party," are implicitly confessional and all quite bleak

    "I'm A Loser" Musically, "I'm a Loser" is strongly influenced by folk music thus nudging folk and rock a little closer together toward the folk-rock explosion of the following year.

    "I Don't Want To Spoil Party" a song overtly influenced by Country music.

    "Every Little Thing”- This song is one of the first precursors of the group's famed "middle period," featuring all of that period's stylistic hallmarks: folk-rock guitars, a fadeout instead of an ending, and unusual instrumentation -- in this case tympani drums, which Ringo added to take 8 to make the finished take 9.

    "What You're Doing"- A huge influence on the folk-rock movement, coming a full six months before the Byrds recorded "Mr. Tambourine Man." There were other stylistic innovations in this recording, including a very heavy (for the time) bass sound and a piano track by George Martin that produced strange chordal effects when laid against the lead guitar. The home key and chord changes would also show up prominently in Paul's songs of the "middle period," particularly "Drive My Car

    1965-

    "Ticket To Ride"- Noted for it's massive chiming and droning bass guitar sound. The raga-rock drum pattern would be followed the next year on "Tomorrow Never Knows". The track uses varispeeding and its use of unrelated coda in the form of a tempo change.

    "Yes It Is"- The unusual dissonance in vocal harmonies. The guitar sounds are created with the use of volume swells with guitar harmonics on two guitar parts.

    The Beatles release the album Help. The Beatles start to show eclecticism that started to reach beyond the bounds of what had previously been considered rock music. Styles like chamber pop, Bluegrass, folk rock, country, and baroque influence start to surface.

    "You Like Me Too Much"- Though a minor George Harrison song it is one of the earliest examples of this technique, the Beatles run the Steinway through a Hammond B-3's rotating Leslie speaker, a trick they would come back to over and over again. When the intro ends, you can actually hear the Leslie being switched off"!

    "Yesterday"- Is the Beatles most covered song is a Chamber Pop instrumental backing consists entirely of acoustic guitar and a string quartet (two violins, viola, and cello), with the two elements mixed 100% apart from each other onto separate stereo channels and the vocal split down the middle.

    "You've Got To Hide Your Love Away"- A very folksy song two-bridge pop song that is in 3/4 time signature in Mixolydian Mode. The fade out with flutes has a baroque styled ending.

    "I've Just Seen a Face"- An acoustic arrangement which integrates R&B, pop-rock, and folk in a bluegrass pace.

    The Shea Stadium concert on August 15. It was the first concert to be held at a major outdoor stadium of over 55,000 people and it starts Arena Rock.

    "We Can Work It Out"- The harmonium swell-pedal crescendos on thee verses are the, textural washes added in the studio, the first of their kind on a Beatles record and signposts to the enriched sound-palette of Revolver. Rock music first major hit using harmonium.

    "Day Tripper"- Riff/ starts the ostinato riff and then with just double-tracked guitar, second with bass guitar added, third with rhythm guitar and. Modified blues progression with harmonic surprises
    Unusual melody: only vaguely blues-related with distinctive use of "dissonant" notes
    Instrumental solo section more complex than usual with multiple layers of activity, increasing tension before breaking back into original ostinato.

    The Beatles (Rubber Soul) 1965 Brian Wilson sited it as an inspiration for "Pet Sounds." This was where rock became a true art form? They incorporated different time signatures, new instruments, European influences, and other musical styles. This album also uses the studio as an instrument before Pet Sounds. "Think for Yourself" and "If I Needed Someone" has guitar tones and vocal harmonies closer to what would be the standard in the psychedelic movement.

    October,(1965) The BEATLES record "Norwegian Wood", which contains elements close to psychedelia. At least two of the band members had taken LSD at this point. The track appears on "Rubber Soul", released in December.The Beatles - Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown) [Take 2] sounds very Psychedelic.

    "Norwegian Wood"- George Harrison becomes the first rock guitarist to play the sitar in a pop recording. The Beatles use non-blues modality ‘; in this song the verse is written in E Mixolydian while the bridge is written in E Dorian. They experimented with non-blues modality even further on Revolver.

    "The Word"- This John Lennon song is known for its pre "All You Need Is Love" hippie anthem by almost two years. The funky bass playing by Paul, odd rhythm by Ringo on what might be the first organ solo (technically harmonium) in a psychedelic rock context, on the Beatles’

    "Think For Yourself"- Is a tour de force in altered scales with lyrics that is political in nature. The song is well known for its use of a double bass style one lead fuzz bass through a fuzz box and the other regular tone.

    Rubber Soul might be the first great rock album and other highlights include the mature "In My Life" and "Michelle"

    1966

    January, (1966) John Lennon writes "Tomorrow Never Knows" The lyrics refer to the same source as Leary's The Psychedelic Experience

    March, (1966) John Lennon records demos for what was to become "She Said, She Said", a clearly LSD-influenced song.

    May 27
    PAPERBACK WRITER / RAIN (single) is released (Capitol Records)

    "Rain"- With its hazy, droning guitars and backwards vocals on the fade. The heavy sonic texture was achieved by recording the music fast then playing the tape normally, "the music had a radically different tonal quality. The bass boosted sound was by using a loudspeaker as a microphone. The guitar sound is hazy drone sound with Paul bass and Ringo drums playing basically lead off each other.

    "Paperback Writer"- Partly influenced by the Who. Paperback Writer is known for its boosted bass sound, soaring vocal harmonies, and fat heavy distorted guitar sound.

    June 6
    "Ed Sullivan Show" - Beatles "Paperback Writer" & "Rain" Promo Videos aired for television

    Revolver (1966) The Beatles (Revolver) 1966 Revolutionary in early preoccupation with "psychedelic" effects as a studio instrument, including electronic/tape effects, sound distortion, influence of Indian music, and avant-garde. New recording technique inclued Automatic Double Tracking, layered tape looped effects, many kinds of reserve tape effects, and vocals through leslie amps.

    "Love You To"- In "Love You To", we find a genuinely Indian-styled usage of mode, melody, rhythm and instrumentation. Even the form, which otherwise maintains a "neo-classical" boxy rock form preserves the Indian convention of an out-of-tempo improvised slow intro". Also considered the first pop song to emulate a non western form in instrumentation and form.

    "Tomorrow Never Knows"- The Beatles, particularly McCartney, became heavily influenced by experimental German composer, Karlheinz Stockhausen. Beginning with Tomorrow Never Knows they began experimenting with tape loops, musique-concrète, backward music, repetition drum & bass sound, and effects which were crucial to the development of modern electronica.

    "Eleanor Rigby"- The song unusual arrangement of a double octet and vocal harmonies marked a departure for pop music. "Eleanor Rigby’ also experiments with mode, though more of an English folk-like approach to modality than an eastern approach.

    "Taxman"- George Harrison song "Taxman". It features a distorted sounding funk riff featuring the dominant 7th/ sharp 9 chord (often called "The Jimi Hendrix Chord") ironically the Beatles used this chord many times before Hendrix THOUGH NEVER OF THEM OF COURSE INVENTED THE CHORD. The song features Indian melody incorporating some ingenious key changes and some unison riffing in the last verse. Of course all underpinned by McCartney funky bass playing. "The Word" from Rubber Soul a year earlier has sort of similar funk groove. I think it's interesting the Beatles compared to their British blues-rock brothers were experimenting with early funk influences and no one really talks about that in their music.

    Revolver has many great songs including the dual guitar harmonies of "And Your Bird Can Sing" and the backward guitar riffs of "I'm Only Sleeping". Along , imbued with churning, distorted guitars, references to drug trips.

    November 24 "Strawberry Fields Forever" recording starts.

    "Strawberry Fields Forever"- A psychedelic classic complete with electronic music and tape- reversed effects, in a maze of odd time signatures. Two different takes were recorded and spliced together using variable tape speed techniques that uses different tempos, in different keys, different instrumental backing. Then the song ends, and then fades back in backwards then in it fades out again. George Harrison plays an exotic Indian instrument swarmandal. Some of the other interesting aspects are reversed cymbals and the fade-out/ false ending/fade-in/ extended jam was a new wrinkle in song form in pop music.

    "Penny Lane"- Uses classical string interludes along with brass instruments for a big production psychedelic pop-rock song. The piano and harmonium were both played through Vox guitar amps and miked to create reverb, feedback that crops up from time to time It's has a wonderful melody, rich chord sequences, and brilliant key changes.

    The Beatles influence on Modern Music

    Beatles' ability to marry studio experimentation with a strong pop song structure is such a profound influence that it's taken for granted. I'd say it's their most important contribution. It's the very foundation of how music is still made, so I'd say their influence is very much evident today, even if not everybody knows it. I still say to this day the most prophetic record of the Sixties wasn't "Yesterday" or "Satisfaction" but "Tomorrow Never Knows," which sums up most of where music has gone. Minus the vocals, it's virtually an early hip-hop record that's as much Public Enemy as it is Philip Glass. Today's music is mostly about sound texture and the group that got us thinking about it the most is the Beatles. Some love to dismiss "Sgt. Peppers," and especially "Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite," if all that random splicing up of tape and punching it into a song for sound effects can't be found in Kanye West or many hip-hop crews of the last 25 years or so.

    Whether we're talking Radiohead, Coldplay, U2, L.A. Reid or Raphel Saadiq, to mention a few, they still mention or show the Beatles' influence. The Smithereens recently covered the entire "Meet the Beatles" album. Phish has performed all of the "White Album" in concert.

    The influence they had on some of their peers.

    Mick Jagger

    "Keith liked the Beatles because he was quite interested in their chord sequences. He also liked their harmonies, which were always a slight problem to the Rolling Stones. Keith always tried to get the harmonies off the ground but they always seemed messy. What we never really got together were Keith and Brian singing backup vocals. It didn't work, because Keith was a better singer and had to keep going, oooh, ooh ooh (laughs). Brian liked all those oohs, which Keith had to put up with. Keith was always capable of much stronger vocals than ooh ooh ooh".

    Keith Richards,

    "The Beatles) were perfect for opening doors... When they went to America they made it wide open for us. We could never have gone there without them. They're so fucking good at what they did. If they'd kept it together and realized what they were doing, instead of now doing Power to the People and disintegrating like that in such a tatty way. It's a shame. The Stones seem to have done much better in just handling success".

    -
    Roger McGuinn

    "When the Beatles had come out, the folk boom had already peaked," McGuinn notes. "The people who had been into it were getting kind of burned out. It just wasn't very gratifying, and it had become so commercial that it had lost its meaning for a lot of people. So the Beatles kind of re-energized it for me. I thought it was natural to put the Beatles' beat and the energy of the Beatles into folk music. And in fact, I heard folk chord changes in the Beatles' music when I listened to their early stuff like 'She Loves You' and 'I Want To Hold Your Hand.' I could hear the passing chords that we always use in folk music: the G-Em-Am-B kind of stuff. So I really think the Beatles invented folk-rock".

    Bob Weir of the Grateful Dead

    "The Beatles were why we turned from a jug band into a rock 'n' roll band," said Bob Weir. "What we saw them doing was impossibly attractive. I couldn't think of anything else more worth doing"

    Bob Dylan

    "They were doing things nobody was doing. Their chords were outrageous, just outrageous, and their harmonies made it all valid. They were pointing the direction music had to go.

    What sparked that original creative spark that
    became prog rock?

    Bill Buford:

    The Beatles. They broke down every barrier that ever existed. Suddenly you could do anything after The Beatles. You could write your own music, make it ninety yards long, put it in 7/4, whatever you wanted.

    Karl Bartos of Kraftwerk

    "Sampling has been around since the Beatles they did it all. There is no difference between using tapes and digital machinery." Yawn again

    Robert Fripp on hearing the Beatles Sgt Pepper

    Robert Fripp- "When I was 20, I worked at a hotel in a dance orchestra, playing weddings, bar-mitzvahs, dancing, cabaret. I drove home and I was also at college at the time. Then I put on the radio (Radio Luxemburg) and I heard this music. It was terrifying. I had no idea what it was. Then it kept going. Then there was this enormous whine note of strings. Then there was this colossal piano chord. I discovered later that I'd come in half-way through Sgt. Pepper, played continuously. My life was never the same again".

    Brian Wilson of the Beach Boys

    "Upon first hearing Rubber Soul in December of 1965, Brian Wilson said, “I really wasn’t quite ready for the unity. It felt like it all belonged together. Rubber Soul was a collection of songs…that somehow went together like no album ever made before".

    Pete Townshend of the Who

    "In a 1967 interview Pete Townshend of the Who commented "I think "Eleanor Rigby" was a very important musical move forward. It certainly inspired me to write and listen to things in that vein"

    BARRY McGUIRE

    What were the key motivations behind your switch from the commercial folk you were doing with the New Christy Minstrels to folk-rock?

    "But times changed, and I changed, and I didn't feel that way anymore. The Beatles were happening. I think that was probably the main thing. The Beatles just changed the whole world of music".
  • The Beatles timeline 1967-1969

    12 mar 2009, 04:41 av RadioheadOasis

    The Beatles 1967-1969

    The Beatles timeline 1967-1969

    1967

    January 5, 1967- “Carnival of Light" is an unreleased avant-garde experimental piece by The Beatles. It was recorded on January 5, 1967; musically it "resembles "The Return of the Son of Monster Magnet" from Frank Zappa’s Freak Out! Album, except there is no rhythm and the music ... is more fragmented, abstract and serious according to Barry Miles. Length 13:48 (approximately

    January 19, 20, 1967- “A Day in the Life" recording starts Paul Grushkin in his book Rockin' Down the Highway: The Cars and People That Made Rock Roll, called the song "one of the most ambitious, influential, and groundbreaking works in pop music history". A five minute song composed of two suites - one by Lennon, one by Paul McCartney - that are totally different in sound and texture, yet complement each other perfectly. The song features two cacophonous crescendos from an orchestra, the final one climaxing in a single E major piano chord that lasts 42 seconds The song has been described as an important song in the Progressive Rock movement.

    March 11 - The band is awarded three Grammy awards for "Michelle", "Eleanor Rigby", and the LP Revolver

    pril 2 - the LP Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band is completed

    June - The Beatles release Sgt Pepper. A landmark of successful and influential experimentation: spawns innumerable (largely unsuccessful) concept albums and a great deal of experimentation with electronic and tape collage effects.

    The album concept is about an imaginary band. The imaginary band could write imaginary songs about imaginary people and situations. Only three songs stay with this concept: the title track, the next track that is segued in, and the Reprise song.

    Avant-garde techniques—particularly in the aleatoric (chance) orchestral section of the last song. A tape looped ending of voices on Sgt Pepper Inner Groove.

    ""Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite"- Includes randomly spliced sections of tapes of organ sounds.

    "Good Morning, Good Morning"- Lennon's lyrics typically dark, and biting. It’s also
    known for its fluctuations in meter and rhythmic patterns. Superficial" use of taped animal sounds.

    ""Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds"- Was one of the first rock songs ever to employ an audio phase shifter or phasing. The sound was originally known as "flanging" because of the way it was first implemented, i.e. by laying your finger against the flange of a tape reel. It came about accidentally when engineer Geoff Emerick, while using the automatic double-tracking system (an electronic looping of one track over to another. The chorus section is more typical shouted rock style and changing time signatures of 3/4 and 4/4 in sections. The complicated underlying arrangement which features a tamboura, played by George Harrison and a Lowrey organ played by Paul McCartney being taped with a special organ stop to give it a sound like a celeste.

    "Within You Without You"- The song, originally written as a 30-minute piece and trimmed down into a mini-version for the album, is in Mixolydian mode. The laughter at the end was Harrison's idea to lighten the mood and follow the theme of the album. It is the second of Harrison's songs to be explicitly influenced by Indian classical music, after "Love You To", and Harrison's only composition on Sgt. Pepper. "Within You Without You" was written on a harmonium and many of the lyrics are influenced by Hindu ideas.

    "She's Leaving Home"- McCartney wrote and sang the verse and Lennon the chorus. This was one of a handful of songs of the Beatles in which the members did not play any instruments. Others include "Eleanor Rigby," "Good Night" and "The Inner Light". The song is about a young girl who'd left home and not been found. The song the string arrangement was done by Mike Leander.

    "A Day in the Life"- A trippy John Lennon song and a peppy Paul McCartney song and linked together with 90 seconds of cacophonous sonic netting. Perhaps the first industrial bridge in a song.

    “All You Need Is Love"- It was first performed by The Beatles on Our World, the first live global television link. Broadcast to 26 countries and watched by 400 million, “All You Need Is Love" remains one of only two songs (along with Pink Floyd's "Money" from 1973) written in 7/4 time to reach the top 20 in the United States.

    “I Am the Walrus”- Lennon composed the avant-garde song by combining three songs he had been working. The songs lyrics were about people who analyzed Beatles' lyrics, he added a verse of nonsense words. The song featured a choir, an orchestra, highly distorted vocals, and the fadeout features sampling of a few lines of Shakespeare's King Lear (Act IV, Scene VI), which were added to the song direct from an AM radio receiving the broadcast of the play on the BBC Home Service.

    "Blue Jay Way"- A song based on Indian raga's with some of the techniques used on previous Psychedelic Records. The use of organ drones, vocals through leslie speakers, diminished 7th chords, backward vocals, raga mode, and phasing create an exotic Indian sound without the use of Indian instruments or guitars.

    "Hello Goodbye"- Maybe one of most Bubblegum of all the Beatles songs does have it's interesting is noted in which the song ends in a cold ending followed by an unrelated coda with an Maori influenced fade-out.

    Magical Mystery Tour is released November 27, 1967 (EP)
    December 8, 1967 (LP)

    1968

    March 15 - the UK single "Lady Madonna" is released (March 18 in the US), hitting #1 in both countries.

    March 9 - the LP Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band wins four Grammy Awards including Album of the Year which was the first time a rock band won that award.

    April - Apple Corps Ltd. begin operations in London along with Apple Publicity.

    May 30 - demos of the songs written in India are recorded at George's home in Esher.

    May - sessions begin for The Beatles

    May - "Revolution 9”- The track was built on the unused portion of "Revolution #1” in which they added on top of that to create "Revolution #9". They added spoken words, and music sound clips, tape loops, reverse sound/music and sound effects. The song is followed by the unaccredited "Can You Take Me Back."). The track Revolution 9" are recordings of other music (from bits of Sibelius, Schumann's "Carnaval" and Beethoven, to a backward snippet of a tuning orchestra, culled from the session tapes for A Day in the Life), the piece can be seen as an early example of sampling.

    July- The single version of "Revolution” is recorded. The song has very political overtones? (Album and single versions differ). The distorted guitar sound was produced by putting the guitars through the recording console and overloading the channel to create a fuzz sound.

    "Hey Jude"- Features a long vocal jam fade-out by Paul, and a 36-piece orchestra for the song's long refrain. The song has two entirely different sections basically a two for one song in the same song. "Hey Jude" remained the longest number one hit for nearly a quarter of a century, until it was surpassed in 1993 by Meat Loaf's "I'd Do Anything for Love (But I Won't Do That)", which ran seven minutes fifty-eight seconds as a single.

    November 1968- The White Album (The Beatles; 1968) .Beatles as individuals rather than members of a group. Stylistically, extremely eclectic: a variety of styles and influences evident. The album contained no singles and became the first double album to hit number one in Britain.

    "Cry Baby Cry"- In an interesting way to assemble a song they added a totally unrelated fragment or outtake of another song "Can you take me back?" which is not listed on the White Album to the end of "Cry Baby Cry"

    "Mother Nature's Son"- McCartney utilized bass drums halfway down a corridor to achieve a staccato sound in “Mother Nature’s Son

    "Yer Blues”- A parody of British Progressive Blues style with some Beatlesque elements of using a bridge and using odd meters.

    "Blackbird”- Folk-like but more "artistic" in its deviations from earlier pop-folk style. The lyrics deal with oppression and civil rights.

    "Helter Skelter"- A song that helped shaped early Heavy Metal. The rock-inflected, ominous melody and words of the song were imposing enough on their own, but it was the unique textures the Beatles devised via their studio arrangement that truly made it into an extraordinary, even apocalyptic song.

    "Happiness Is a Warm Gun"- The track is actually a combination of no less than five different sections, and various musical styles in a track that is less than 3 minutes. The track is noted for its use of odd meters and at one point using a polyrhythm which at the time was unusual for rock music.

    1969

    January, 26 1969 recording “The Long and Winding Road”. It became The Beatles' last #1 song in the United States on 23 May 1970[1], and was their last real single. "The Long and Winding Road" was listed with "For You Blue" as a double-sided hit when the single hit number one on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 in 1970.

    January 30 - The band and organ player Billy Preston perform four songs from the roof of the Apple business offices. Because it is in a business district, the police are called to end the mini-concert. The event is recorded for the "Let It Be" film

    February 1969- “I Want You (She's So Heavy) recording starts. The song has limited number of words, two different sections one very bluesy and very angst type vocals from Lennon. The other section is a instrumental built on proto metal type of guitar sound with repeated guitar figures, jazzy and Latin drum influence, avant white noise from a synthesizer, and abrupt cut-off ending.

    February 1969- "Something" written by George Harrison is the Beatles second most covered song. Frank Sinatra called Something "the greatest love song ever written," he sang it hundreds of times at various concerts.

    April 11 - The single "Get Back/Don't Let Me Down" is released and hits #1 in the US and UK.

    May - "The Ballad of John and Yoko/Old Brown Shoe" is released, reaching #1 in the UK, but stalling at #8 in the US because of objection to the use of "Christ" in the chorus

    June - John and Yoko hold another "bed-in" at a Montreal hotel, where they record "Give Peace a Chance" (credited to Lennon/McCartney). The song is released by The Plastic Ono Band in July and hits US #14 and UK #2. It features Timothy Leary and Tommy Smothers, among others, clapping in the background.

    August 1- the Beatles start recording the classically influenced Art- Rock song “Because”. It features a 3-part harmony vocal performance between Lennon, McCartney and George Harrison, overdubbed three times to make nine voices in all. The song is actually influenced by "Moonlight Sonata" by Ludwig van Beethoven but the song structure is not "Moonlight Sonata" backwards as some have said. It includes an analog synthesizer arrangement by George Harrison

    August 8 - The cover photo for the LP Abbey Road is taken at 11:35 AM.

    August 20 - The last recording session in which all four Beatles are present

    September - LP Abbey Road is released and hits UK and US #1, going on to become the best-selling Beatles album of all time. It was the Beatles last album to be recorded although Let It Be is last to be released.

    The Abbey Road Medleys- McCartney & Martin agree to try to link the last 8 songs on side two into a larger integrated formal unit. Uses song fragments from both McCartney and Lennon; repeats some melodies at strategic points. Starting with "You Never Give Me Your Money" "McCartney was playing with loops again and assembled a collection of Moog and other sounds for use on the album. “Paul took a plastic bag containing a dozen loose strands of mono tape into Abbey Road,” The effects—sounding like bells, birds, bubbles and crickets chirping allowed for a perfect cross fade in the medley from "Sun King" into "You Never Give Me Your Money". The melodies are repeated it flows, and it’s progressive rock like

    October 14 - University of Michigan graduate Fred LaBour writes a very lengthy and detailed article in The Michigan Daily about the hidden clues on the band's LPs and songs that Paul is dead, inspired by the infamous discovery of backmasking in several songs by Detroit DJ Russ Gibb.

    October 24 - Following John's request that the Beatles call it quits, Paul states in an Life magazine interview that the band has broken up. He states that the "Beatles thing is over", but it is debated whether he was talking about the band as a whole or the 'Paul is Dead' rumors.

    November 7 - Publication of Paul's interview with Life magazine, in which he goes into the hinted breakup of the band more in depth.

    December - the Beatles donate a new song, "Across the Universe", to the World Wildlife Fund for inclusion on the benefit album No One's Gonna Change Our World.

    The Beatles influence on Modern Music

    Beatles' ability to marry studio experimentation with a strong pop song structure is such a profound influence that it's taken for granted. I'd say it's their most important contribution. It's the very foundation of how music is still made, so I'd say their influence is very much evident today, even if not everybody knows it. I still say to this day the most prophetic record of the Sixties wasn't "Yesterday" or "Satisfaction" but "Tomorrow Never Knows," which sums up most of where music has gone. Minus the vocals, it's virtually an early hip-hop record that's as much Public Enemy as it is Philip Glass. Today's music is mostly about sound texture and the group that got us thinking about it the most is the Beatles. Some love to dismiss "Sgt. Peppers," and especially "Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite," if all that random splicing up of tape and punching it into a song for sound effects can't be found in Kanye West or many hip-hop crews of the last 25 years or so.

    Whether we're talking Radiohead, Coldplay, U2, L.A. Reid or Raphel Saadiq, to mention a few, they still mention or show the Beatles' influence. The Smithereens recently covered the entire "Meet the Beatles" album. Phish has performed all of the "White Album" in concert.

    The influence they had on some of their peers.

    - Mick Jagger

    "Keith liked the Beatles because he was quite interested in their chord sequences. He also liked their harmonies, which were always a slight problem to the Rolling Stones. Keith always tried to get the harmonies off the ground but they always seemed messy. What we never really got together were Keith and Brian singing backup vocals. It didn't work, because Keith was a better singer and had to keep going, oooh, ooh ooh (laughs). Brian liked all those oohs, which Keith had to put up with. Keith was always capable of much stronger vocals than ooh ooh ooh".

    Keith Richards,

    "The Beatles) were perfect for opening doors... When they went to America they made it wide open for us. We could never have gone there without them. They're so fucking good at what they did. If they'd kept it together and realized what they were doing, instead of now doing Power to the People and disintegrating like that in such a tatty way. It's a shame. The Stones seem to have done much better in just handling success".

    -
    Roger McGuinn

    "When the Beatles had come out, the folk boom had already peaked," McGuinn notes. "The people who had been into it were getting kind of burned out. It just wasn't very gratifying, and it had become so commercial that it had lost its meaning for a lot of people. So the Beatles kind of re-energized it for me. I thought it was natural to put the Beatles' beat and the energy of the Beatles into folk music. And in fact, I heard folk chord changes in the Beatles' music when I listened to their early stuff like 'She Loves You' and 'I Want To Hold Your Hand.' I could hear the passing chords that we always use in folk music: the G-Em-Am-B kind of stuff. So I really think the Beatles invented folk-rock".

    Bob Weir of the Grateful Dead

    "The Beatles were why we turned from a jug band into a rock 'n' roll band," said Bob Weir. "What we saw them doing was impossibly attractive. I couldn't think of anything else more worth doing"

    Bob Dylan

    "They were doing things nobody was doing. Their chords were outrageous, just outrageous, and their harmonies made it all valid. They were pointing the direction music had to go.

    What sparked that original creative spark that
    became prog rock?

    Bill Buford:

    The Beatles. They broke down every barrier that ever existed. Suddenly you could do anything after The Beatles. You could write your own music, make it ninety yards long, put it in 7/4, whatever you wanted.

    Karl Bartos of Kraftwerk

    "Sampling has been around since the Beatles they did it all. There is no difference between using tapes and digital machinery." Yawn again

    Robert Fripp on hearing the Beatles Sgt Pepper

    Robert Fripp- "When I was 20, I worked at a hotel in a dance orchestra, playing weddings, bar-mitzvahs, dancing, cabaret. I drove home and I was also at college at the time. Then I put on the radio (Radio Luxemburg) and I heard this music. It was terrifying. I had no idea what it was. Then it kept going. Then there was this enormous whine note of strings. Then there was this colossal piano chord. I discovered later that I'd come in half-way through Sgt. Pepper, played continuously. My life was never the same again".

    Brian Wilson of the Beach Boys

    "Upon first hearing Rubber Soul in December of 1965, Brian Wilson said, “I really wasn’t quite ready for the unity. It felt like it all belonged together. Rubber Soul was a collection of songs…that somehow went together like no album ever made before".

    Pete Townshend of the Who

    "In a 1967 interview Pete Townshend of the Who commented "I think "Eleanor Rigby" was a very important musical move forward. It certainly inspired me to write and listen to things in that vein"

    BARRY McGUIRE

    What were the key motivations behind your switch from the commercial folk you were doing with the New Christy Minstrels to folk-rock?

    "But times changed, and I changed, and I didn't feel that way anymore. The Beatles were happening. I think that was probably the main thing. The Beatles just changed the whole world of music".