Depression

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Skapad den: 13 apr 2006
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Depression...

WHAT IS A DEPRESSIVE DISORDER?

A depressive disorder is an illness that involves the body, mood, and thoughts. It affects the way a person eats and sleeps, the way one feels about oneself, and the way one thinks about things. A depressive disorder is not the same as a passing blue mood. It is not a sign of personal weakness or a condition that can be willed or wished away. People with a depressive illness cannot merely "pull themselves together" and get better. Without treatment, symptoms can last for weeks, months, or years. Appropriate treatment, however, can help most people who suffer from depression.
TYPES OF DEPRESSION

Depressive disorders come in different forms, just as is the case with other illnesses such as heart disease. This pamphlet briefly describes three of the most common types of depressive disorders. However, within these types there are variations in the number of symptoms, their severity, and persistence.

Major depression is manifested by a combination of symptoms (see symptom list) that interfere with the ability to work, study, sleep, eat, and enjoy once pleasurable activities. Such a disabling episode of depression may occur only once but more commonly occurs several times in a lifetime.

A less severe type of depression, dysthymia, involves long-term, chronic symptoms that do not disable, but keep one from functioning well or from feeling good. Many people with dysthymia also experience major depressive episodes at some time in their lives.

Another type of depression is bipolar disorder, also called manic-depressive illness. Not nearly as prevalent as other forms of depressive disorders, bipolar disorder is characterized by cycling mood changes: severe highs (mania) and lows (depression). Sometimes the mood switches are dramatic and rapid, but most often they are gradual. When in the depressed cycle, an individual can have any or all of the symptoms of a depressive disorder. When in the manic cycle, the individual may be overactive, overtalkative, and have a great deal of energy. Mania often affects thinking, judgment, and social behavior in ways that cause serious problems and embarrassment. For example, the individual in a manic phase may feel elated, full of grand schemes that might range from unwise business decisions to romantic sprees. Mania, left untreated, may worsen to a psychotic state.
SYMPTOMS OF DEPRESSION AND MANIA

Not everyone who is depressed or manic experiences every symptom. Some people experience a few symptoms, some many. Severity of symptoms varies with individuals and also varies over time.
Depression

* Persistent sad, anxious, or "empty" mood
* Feelings of hopelessness, pessimism
* Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, helplessness
* Loss of interest or pleasure in hobbies and activities that were once enjoyed, including sex
* Decreased energy, fatigue, being "slowed down"
* Difficulty concentrating, remembering, making decisions
* Insomnia, early-morning awakening, or oversleeping
* Appetite and/or weight loss or overeating and weight gain
* Thoughts of death or suicide; suicide attempts
* Restlessness, irritability
* Persistent physical symptoms that do not respond to treatment, such as headaches, digestive disorders, and chronic pain

Mania

* Abnormal or excessive elation
* Unusual irritability
* Decreased need for sleep
* Grandiose notions
* Increased talking
* Racing thoughts
* Increased sexual desire
* Markedly increased energy
* Poor judgment
* Inappropriate social behavior

CAUSES OF DEPRESSION

Some types of depression run in families, suggesting that a biological vulnerability can be inherited. This seems to be the case with bipolar disorder. Studies of families in which members of each generation develop bipolar disorder found that those with the illness have a somewhat different genetic makeup than those who do not get ill. However, the reverse is not true: Not everybody with the genetic makeup that causes vulnerability to bipolar disorder will have the illness. Apparently additional factors, possibly stresses at home, work, or school, are involved in its onset.

In some families, major depression also seems to occur generation after generation. However, it can also occur in people who have no family history of depression. Whether inherited or not, major depressive disorder is often associated with changes in brain structures or brain function.

People who have low self-esteem, who consistently view themselves and the world with pessimism or who are readily overwhelmed by stress, are prone to depression. Whether this represents a psychological predisposition or an early form of the illness is not clear.

In recent years, researchers have shown that physical changes in the body can be accompanied by mental changes as well. Medical illnesses such as stroke, a heart attack, cancer, Parkinson's disease, and hormonal disorders can cause depressive illness, making the sick person apathetic and unwilling to care for his or her physical needs, thus prolonging the recovery period. Also, a serious loss, difficult relationship, financial problem, or any stressful (unwelcome or even desired) change in life patterns can trigger a depressive episode. Very often, a combination of genetic, psychological, and environmental factors is involved in the onset of a depressive disorder. Later episodes of illness typically are precipitated by only mild stresses, or none at all.
Depression in Women

Women experience depression about twice as often as men.1 Many hormonal factors may contribute to the increased rate of depression in women particularly such factors as menstrual cycle changes, pregnancy, miscarriage, postpartum period, pre-menopause, and menopause. Many women also face additional stresses such as responsibilities both at work and home, single parenthood, and caring for children and for aging parents.

A recent NIMH study showed that in the case of severe premenstrual syndrome (PMS), women with a preexisting vulnerability to PMS experienced relief from mood and physical symptoms when their sex hormones were suppressed. Shortly after the hormones were re-introduced, they again developed symptoms of PMS. Women without a history of PMS reported no effects of the hormonal manipulation.6,7

Many women are also particularly vulnerable after the birth of a baby. The hormonal and physical changes, as well as the added responsibility of a new life, can be factors that lead to postpartum depression in some women. While transient "blues" are common in new mothers, a full-blown depressive episode is not a normal occurrence and requires active intervention. Treatment by a sympathetic physician and the family's emotional support for the new mother are prime considerations in aiding her to recover her physical and mental well-being and her ability to care for and enjoy the infant.
Depression in Men

Although men are less likely to suffer from depression than women, 6 million men in the United States are affected by the illness. Men are less likely to admit to depression, and doctors are less likely to suspect it. The rate of suicide in men is four times that of women, though more women attempt it. In fact, after age 70, the rate of men's suicide rises, reaching a peak after age 85.

Depression can also affect the physical health in men differently from women. A new study shows that, although depression is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease in both men and women, only men suffer a high death rate.2

Men's depression is often masked by alcohol or drugs, or by the socially acceptable habit of working excessively long hours. Depression typically shows up in men not as feeling hopeless and helpless, but as being irritable, angry, and discouraged; hence, depression may be difficult to recognize as such in men. Even if a man realizes that he is depressed, he may be less willing than a woman to seek help. Encouragement and support from concerned family members can make a difference. In the workplace, employee assistance professionals or worksite mental health programs can be of assistance in helping men understand and accept depression as a real illness that needs treatment.
Depression in the Elderly

Some people have the mistaken idea that it is normal for the elderly to feel depressed. On the contrary, most older people feel satisfied with their lives. Sometimes, though, when depression develops, it may be dismissed as a normal part of aging. Depression in the elderly, undiagnosed and untreated, causes needless suffering for the family and for the individual who could otherwise live a fruitful life. When he or she does go to the doctor, the symptoms described are usually physical, for the older person is often reluctant to discuss feelings of hopelessness, sadness, loss of interest in normally pleasurable activities, or extremely prolonged grief after a loss.

Recognizing how depressive symptoms in older people are often missed, many health care professionals are learning to identify and treat the underlying depression. They recognize that some symptoms may be side effects of medication the older person is taking for a physical problem, or they may be caused by a co-occurring illness. If a diagnosis of depression is made, treatment with medication and/or psychotherapy will help the depressed person return to a happier, more fulfilling life. Recent research suggests that brief psychotherapy (talk therapies that help a person in day-to-day relationships or in learning to counter the distorted negative thinking that commonly accompanies depression) is effective in reducing symptoms in short-term depression in older persons who are medically ill. Psychotherapy is also useful in older patients who cannot or will not take medication. Efficacy studies show that late-life depression can be treated with psychotherapy.4

Improved recognition and treatment of depression in late life will make those years more enjoyable and fulfilling for the depressed elderly person, the family, and caretakers.
Depression in Children

Only in the past two decades has depression in children been taken very seriously. The depressed child may pretend to be sick, refuse to go to school, cling to a parent, or worry that the parent may die. Older children may sulk, get into trouble at school, be negative, grouchy, and feel misunderstood. Because normal behaviors vary from one childhood stage to another, it can be difficult to tell whether a child is just going through a temporary "phase" or is suffering from depression. Sometimes the parents become worried about how the child's behavior has changed, or a teacher mentions that "your child doesn't seem to be himself." In such a case, if a visit to the child's pediatrician rules out physical symptoms, the doctor will probably suggest that the child be evaluated, preferably by a psychiatrist who specializes in the treatment of children. If treatment is needed, the doctor may suggest that another therapist, usually a social worker or a psychologist, provide therapy while the psychiatrist will oversee medication if it is needed. Parents should not be afraid to ask questions: What are the therapist's qualifications? What kind of therapy will the child have? Will the family as a whole participate in therapy? Will my child's therapy include an antidepressant? If so, what might the side effects be?

The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) has identified the use of medications for depression in children as an important area for research. The NIMH-supported Research Units on Pediatric Psychopharmacology (RUPPs) form a network of seven research sites where clinical studies on the effects of medications for mental disorders can be conducted in children and adolescents. Among the medications being studied are antidepressants, some of which have been found to be effective in treating children with depression, if properly monitored by the child's physician.

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  • AsepticVoid

    Aseptic Void - Carnal https://asepticvoid.bandcamp.com/album/carnal #darkambient #isolationism #soundscape #asepticvoid

    22 sep 16:13 Svara
  • VladdaMeer

    I think my mood influences music which I choose in that moment. But I stick to genres and artists which I personally prefer. I also do not hate any music genre....

    14 sep 18:53 Svara
  • Your_Old

    I don't think my music influences my mood. I rather choose certain music according to how I feel, and it's not the same. Btw, I don't hate music genres that don't fit my taste.

    9 sep 13:02 Svara
  • QuiteQuiett

    Tbh I'm addicted to depression,i enjoy being depressed at times.and I don't think it weird..sometimes

    9 sep 08:36 Svara
  • chroniz

    RIP Robin Williams, depression truly sucks. All the best for the other people getting better with their lives.

    13 aug 11:13 Svara
  • jaquedickinson

    blind_drummer If I'm a one more stereotype so you are a sucker :) Yes I have no patience with people like you. Piss of you jerk. For this reason I hate human begins

    21 jul 23:17 Svara
  • blind_drummer

    u'r just one more stereotype... You seem to be a truly smart-ass. It is funny cause every psychitrist and psychologist would tell you something very different about music infulence. But oh, just another stereotype..

    30 jun 22:13 Svara
  • jaquedickinson

    I hate this music style however I'm depressed it HAS NOTHING TO DO. This is just one more stupid stereotype invented by people.

    28 jun 13:27 Svara
  • blind_drummer

    in fact... you are wrong. It HAS something. Music, your enviroment, books that you are reading CAN easily deepen ur depression. It is easy. It wont cause your illness but why not make it stronger. See, thats the point.

    26 jun 23:35 Svara
  • ArctosaCinerea

    Yeah I agree with you, jaquedickinson! Music has nothing to do with illness.

    23 jun 13:30 Svara
  • jaquedickinson

    " Opeth, Katatonia, Anathema, Agalloch, no surprise at all". If depression were something related to musical taste then I've not been suffering from this disorder . Music has nothing to do with illnesses

    22 jun 05:50 Svara
  • Qwikh

    Opeth, Katatonia, Anathema, Agalloch, no surprise at all.

    19 apr 21:11 Svara
  • Your_Old

    It turned out that I have manic depression, can I stay here? :(

    5 apr 12:55 Svara
  • Myshkinas

    This is Lithuanian depression forum group. Everybody is wellcome. http://www.last.fm/group/Kovos+su+depresija+klubas

    16 mar 06:05 Svara
  • bchew1

    Dying Sun - Transcendence www.dyingsun.us for links to free download on bandcamp.

    15 jan 00:14 Svara
  • AsepticVoid

    Aseptic Void - Psychosis released today on Cryo Chamber http://cryochamber.bandcamp.com/album/psychosis "Aseptic Void known for his stellar work on the Slender Woods game debuts on Cryo Chamber with his album Psychosis. A fitting name for the visions it creates of mental asylums and damaged psyches. Conjuring visions of decayed, abandoned playgrounds and rusted up old schoolyards while the illusion rots away, this is pure darkness molded into black ambient noise"- Simon H. (ATRIUM CARCERI)

    25 sep 2013 Svara
  • Lysyane

    Tem um site de uma ONG e um blog que me ajudaram muito com a depressão. Os dois são realmente interessantes, mas o lastfm não deixa eu postar os links aqui. Procurem por "Pensamentos Filmados" e "Suicida Sobrevivente" no google.

    7 sep 2013 Svara
  • DrStrangeIove

    one day i will walk again... mein Führer...

    8 jun 2013 Svara
  • Speedmetal80s

    beautiful? wtf. depression has made me stop doing most things I used to like now I don't even wanna leave my house or talk to people. I just wanna sit in a room and stare

    8 maj 2013 Svara
  • TabooEv

    Me...

    23 apr 2013 Svara
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