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Most Influential Genre of Music

 
  • Metal, the most popular and listened to genre in the world

    • [Raderad användare] sa...
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    • 30 maj 2012, 13:52
    bryantheqb said:
    Metal, the most popular and listened to genre in the world

    ಠ_ಠ

    I don't mean to be insulting but thats probably one of the most reductive and narrow-focused things i've ever read. Is the human race not as old as i've been led to believe? Is music a recent invention that only arrived a century or so after the industrial revolution?

    This thread is weird.

    • Bloopy sa...
    • Forum Moderator
    • 30 maj 2012, 22:22
    Ice age flute carved from mammoth ivory circa 40,000BC, found in southern Germany. Metal as f****, Burzum should use it on his next album.


    • [Raderad användare] sa...
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    • 30 maj 2012, 22:26
    ^ Mammoth Bone Metal. Could be the next big thing Bloopy. I definately won't steal the idea for my own selfishly nefarious purposes.

    :3

  • Classical music, on the whole. The way composers used harmony throughout the eras has, I think, affected songwriting nowadays. Key progressions, inversions, loads of it.

    • Bloopy sa...
    • Forum Moderator
    • 30 maj 2012, 23:15
    Selfsurprise said:
    Could be the next big thing Bloopy.
    No no, I'm saying it was the next big thing 42,000 years ago, and music has been brutal ever since, possibly corroborating bryantheqb's statement. I guess it's retro hipster now.

    • Kennoth sa...
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    • 31 maj 2012, 02:58
    Umm, rock?

    Kennoth said:
    I'd say rock...


    Guess two year younger me though the same. But now that I think of it, I could rectify my opinion to "blues".

    Change is coming through my shadow. My shadow's shedding skin, I've been picking my scabs again.

  • Blues.

    Without Blues we would not have Jazz or rock or country or R&B or rap/hiphop. Pop is arguable since Blues and Jazz used to be the "pop" music of pre WWII America.

  • Alexface21 said:
    Classical music, on the whole. The way composers used harmony throughout the eras has, I think, affected songwriting nowadays. Key progressions, inversions, loads of it.


    I want this to be true but too many genres nowadays neglect the intricacy of Classical.

    • [Raderad användare] sa...
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    • 12 jul 2012, 07:55
    Funny how industrial music has been overlooked in this thread, as if it were just another example of a descendant from the divergent branches of oft cited blues, jazz, etc. If you believed what you heard then it would seem the caucasian race hadn't come up with anything original for the last two centuries ;p

    Not wishing to be controversial or provocative or nowt, but I was wondering what everyone thought of this particular strain of music. Particularly in some of its more extreme manifestations such as , / or (harsh noise wall) - I remember watching a rather dodgy video on youtube where Tom Metzger (yes, that Tom Metzger unfortunately) interviewed Boyd Rice about how he distanced himself from the more strongly liberal punk scene he grew up with, and consequently how he and other white musicians started to make "electronic music" of a sort distinct from what was generally known about.

    Boyd Rice makes an interesting though somewhat generalizing point in that video; "People in the press dubbed my music 'industrial' after this one band (Throbbing Gristle) said what they did was 'industrial music' and they said this was the first kind of white music to be made in hundreds and hundreds of years because a lot of the popular music has been influenced by black influences, Little Richard for example..." At which point one of Metzger's associate agrees and says something along the lines of "the media likes to present us as 'one people' but when you go to these rock concerts they seem like the most segregated thing since a Klan rally".

    My confidence in Boyd Rice does take a beating whn he describes Current 93 and Davi Tibet's output as 'racialist music', as well as the fact that later-on in his career he claims he agreed to the inerview as a sort of sensationalist prank. But still an interesting point was raised even if the interview was a pitiful excuse to pigeonhole an entire movement into a single sentiment and intent. Its a shame that one can't bring up the subject of ‘whiteness’ in music without it being haunted by deeply entrenched idealogies on either side of the spectrum.

    I urge anyone interested in the subject to watch that video, heres the least biased and politically sound version. There is a longer and suspiciously-edited version of the same video on youtube posted by a white supremacist website called resist.com (which is worth checking out for the hilariously bad layout alone) but actually the content of the aforementioned interview isn’t the kind of swivel-eyed neo-naziish closet homoerotic diatribe you might, fairly, be expecting.

    Redigerat av en raderad användare den 12 jul 2012, 08:23
  • Classical and trailer music, hands down.

    “Get beyond love and grief: exist for the good of Man.”
    Miyamoto Musashi, The Book of Five Rings
  • double personality

    my older side says jazz and the younger one britpop..

    @theokaraeng
    • Bloopy sa...
    • Forum Moderator
    • 12 jul 2012, 10:12
    Selfsurprise said:
    Not wishing to be controversial or provocative or nowt, but I was wondering what everyone thought of this particular strain of music.
    I think industrial (at least in the original sense) is completely eclipsed by noise, due to the century of history. Noise spawned industrial, as well as electronic and ambient music, so noise could be a good answer to this thread. Industrial is just one arm of a multi-limbed influential beast.

  • ^

    • [Raderad användare] sa...
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    • 15 jul 2012, 19:39
    Bloopy said:
    Selfsurprise said:
    Not wishing to be controversial or provocative or nowt, but I was wondering what everyone thought of this particular strain of music.
    I think industrial (at least in the original sense) is completely eclipsed by noise, due to the century of history. Noise spawned industrial, as well as electronic and ambient music, so noise could be a good answer to this thread. Industrial is just one arm of a multi-limbed influential beast.

    I find that a surprising answer, though its a very intelligent point :3

    Do you think noise has eclipsed 'industrial'? If you wanted to push the definition of industrial music to include artists like Ministry, Skinny Puppy or Rammstein (not that i'm holding them up as representative 'examples' of the genre) people have often heard of those bands in a populist context, even if only by name or by a handful of better known songs. People might of heard of Merzbow and Wolf Eyes but for a lot of music fans this seems be an anecdotal acquaintance at best, something read about or heard of in passing and often from less than informed sources.

    I know from reading reviews for noise albums/bands in more orthodox music magazines (think Rock Sound or Metal Hammer) that tend, even when they are favourable reviews, to focus on what they perceive as a ‘lack’ of music, as if noise were just a shallow gesture of aimless nihilism and not infact a slow-building and diverse movement that avoids burning out by remaining relatively inaccessible.
    But now that I’ve had time to think about it I can kind of see how noise might infact be more influential from its strictly industrial heritage. Even if a majority of listeners aren’t informed about HNW or power electronics then a lot of the musicians they follow are likely to be aware of more itinerant or ‘fringe’ activities.

    • Bloopy sa...
    • Forum Moderator
    • 16 jul 2012, 10:35
    When I said eclipsed, what I was thinking is that industrial is largely overlapped by noise. Things like old school industrial, power electronics and death industrial sound like sub-genres of noise to me, even though that's not entirely where the influences filtered through from. Interestingly, early noise composer Luigi Russolo was influenced by industrialization in the first place.

    It reminds me of the Most Innovative Genre thread. To expand the sentence I posted there, you could measure both innovation and influence by how many sub-genres a genre spawns.

    • [Raderad användare] sa...
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    • 17 jul 2012, 19:04
    Bloopy said:
    When I said eclipsed, what I was thinking is that industrial is largely overlapped by noise. Things like old school industrial, power electronics and death industrial sound like sub-genres of noise to me, even though that's not entirely where the influences filtered through from. Interestingly, early noise composer Luigi Russolo was influenced by industrialization in the first place.

    It reminds me of the Most Innovative Genre thread. To expand the sentence I posted there, you could measure both innovation and influence by how many sub-genres a genre spawns.

    I wish more internet discussion regarding music was like this. You've challened my post intelligntly and without being dramatic or argumentative and i've actually reconsidered my position on it. Noise probably does have a more entrenched influence on music at the present than old school industrial does now, speaking in up-to-the-minute contemporary terms that is. Well done sir! :D

    • Bloopy sa...
    • Forum Moderator
    • 17 jul 2012, 22:30
    Twas hardly even a challenge. You did ask what we thought of industrial in the context of this thread!

    I'll challenge your comparison of Ministry/Rammstein to Wolf Eyes/Merzbow though. Industrial metal really is pushing the definition, given it's a crossover genre. Noise could claim some bigger artists like Sonic Youth, Sleigh Bells and Fantômas.

    • [Raderad användare] sa...
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    • 18 jul 2012, 09:18
    Bloopy said:
    Twas hardly even a challenge. You did ask what we thought of industrial in the context of this thread!

    I'll challenge your comparison of Ministry/Rammstein to Wolf Eyes/Merzbow though. Industrial metal really is pushing the definition, given it's a crossover genre. Noise could claim some bigger artists like Sonic Youth, Sleigh Bells and Fantômas.

    I wasn't comparing them as such, I was just trying to demonstrate they have a common heritage. Noise as a genre seems to be such an overwhelmingly subjective term when compared to other styles that its remarkable that anyone has ever reached a consensus on what 'noise' is exactly. I know on the few occasions i've looked at the tag page i'm always surprised by who is on there.

  • Not really fair to refer to 'classical' as one genre because then it dwarfs the rest of music combined. The most influential is perhaps Renaissance music. Polyphonic music was on the verge of annihilation at the hands of the Catholic church, as they were frustrated about not being able to hear the lyrics when different words were being sung at once. Very likely in response to this, Palestrina composed the 'Pope Marcellus Mass', which has 4 voices singing the same words at the same time but on different notes. This convinced the church to continue allowing such music. This adjustment very well might have saved Western music from being set back a century or two.

    • alin1 sa...
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    • 18 jan 2014, 13:44
    I'd say that these main genres are the most influential: classical, rock, electronic, ambient, country, folk, blues, jazz, hip hop, experimental music (noise/avant-garde/drone/etc).

    PS: metal seems to be an evolution (or involution, depending of who you're asking) of rock.

    Redigerad av alin1 den 18 jan 2014, 15:04
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    Redigerad av hjbardenhagen den 11 feb 2014, 07:18
  • It really depends on how you define influential.
    I mean are we talking about direct or in-direct influences?
    If it is the latter you can't really say things like metal, because then the sounds that created genre (blues, folk, jazz, psychedelic rock) is more influential since it had a wider spread.

  • I'm not so sure about Classical, of course it is a serious, beautiful music.
    Although most of the music we listen to today was inspired by slave songs, folk songs (northern Europe), cowboy songs and theatre. IMO.

    "I never picked cotton"
  • Or most popular music today has its roots in the above, there's probably a few I've omitted. I guess though, classical has in part influence in Big Band Jazz and lends a hand to song writing.

    "I never picked cotton"
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