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Most Innovative Genre of Music Currently

 
  • Most Innovative Genre of Music Currently

    Saw the thread about the most influential genre, and I thought this would be a cool discussion.

    Which genre of music is the most innovative at the moment in your opinion? By innovative, I mean most willing to try new things... I'd have to go with hip hop. Right now, Hip Hop is bringing a lot of new stuff to the table in the underground experimental field in terms of production, synth work, and lyricism.

    #TYBG
  • The is definitely a lot of cool new stuff in hip hop appearing at the moment, though perhaps the term 'hip hop' is so broad that it will always have a lot of potential to evolve?

    Honestly I don't think any genres that I listen to personally are NOT innovative, though I'm tempted to say that is one of the most innovative styles out there. Just my opinion though ;)

    • _Caldera sa...
    • Användare
    • 29 maj 2012, 18:50
    Hip hop always seems to rediscover itself.

  • DANCECORPS said:
    The is definitely a lot of cool new stuff in hip hop appearing at the moment, though perhaps the term 'hip hop' is so broad that it will always have a lot of potential to evolve?

    Honestly I don't think any genres that I listen to personally are NOT innovative, though I'm tempted to say that is one of the most innovative styles out there. Just my opinion though ;)

    No bias there at all, amirite? :P

    n all seriousness though, the majority of stuff I listen to isn't all that innovative so I'd probably go with breakcore too.

    • [Raderad användare] sa...
    • Användare
    • 30 maj 2012, 21:59
    I hope none of this comes across as too biased or narrow-focused, but based on what i've seen and heard from new artists, and what i've read in the music press and critical circles, as well as the general proliferation and environment of rampant cross-fertilization that dominates the scenes - heres several of the more recent genres and directions that seemed to of had an impact on the more obscure corners of music (i'm deliberately not picking my absolute favorites because I honestly think they all have a fairly cohesive and small fanbase)

    - I know many of you will groan at this point, but thats only because yer thinking of all the stadium-ready brostep nonsense. Scratch the surface and you'll find various electronic units (grime, drum n' bass, etc) embracing and mutating the dubstep norms. You'll find metal legends like Justin Broadrick and Nicholas Bullen investing a lot of their time and effort in very serious duibstep-informed heavy electronics side-projects.

    Thats not to mention all the more radio-friendly popular mannifestations bandwagoning on the reliable trick of having "a phat filthy bassline, yo", much to the chagrin of long-term funky folk. Whatever you think of dubstep it isn't just going to go away, its not a mere novelty bereft and exhausted of potential. Its threading delicate veins of influence wherever it goes and eventually the qualities therein might arguably become as universally overlooked as the 4x4 beat or 'devils interval' is now.

    / - There are few movements that represent the non-denominational and unspecific audience appeal that so-called 'newbreed' music garnered during the late 00's as that phenomena collectively blanketed under the term witch house. Produced and disseminated under a number of guises - drag, ghostdrone, even rapegaze! (perhaps rather knowingly I suspect, despite the protestations of the internets more hysterical and uninformed visitors) - witch house was largely criticized by many for failing in many respects to cohese into a uniform sound or consensus of sentiment. But i'd like to challenge that assumption.

    Witch house is a multi-headed Scyllan beast 'tis true (ooh aar!) but for those of us familiar with its unambitious standards and intentionally lo-fi approach there are noticeable (if subtle) threads of similiarity between acts as diverse as Gvcci Hvcci (white girl "hex hop" rave-FX scavenger), Princess Nikotin (ghostly rusting encrustations of droning longterm ambience) and d3thplay (neo-satanic-teenage-neon-drenched-down-tempo trance-trips-into-the-elemental-plane-of-Gverb) that those of us terminally infected with the newbreed bug can distinquish.

    There is quote from a book I brought recently that can summarize it better than I ever could. A curator named Lisa Le Feuvre (writing in the context of the British Art Show 7 she co-organized) said; "The art of the present is too close to be judged or made sense of now; too unkown to be forced into language; too bright to do anything other than dazzle those who try to look at it. If we want to understand it, we must wait until it stops changing and living, until it eases into a position of comprehensibility and is written into history". It will take someone far more erudite and systematic than I to even begin to survey and catalogue an overview of witch house.

    - Admittedly the whole process of "electro-acoustic" methodology and experimental documentation has been around for donkeys years, but there has been a noticeable rise of interest in this overarching 'style' in recent times - especially in magazines like The WIRE.

    Both recalling and owing a great deal to genres like improvization (the more critically rigorous stuff, as opposed to some blokes jamming), free jazz at its most sparsely melodious, musique concrète and even good old fashioned noise/industrial music - electroacoustic records might not be as lauded by the music-going masses as their obviously 'composed' relatives might be, but rather than impacting onto the impressionable minds of musicians this stuff slowly radiates outwardly in slow laborious ripples, fragmentary elements, nifty tonal effects and near-avian guttural squeaks worm their way into unexpected places to surprise and bewilder the less patient listener, leaving the good stuff for those of us who like music in its rawest and alchemical state.

    Sadly the public arent as keen to embrace the avant-garde in music as readily as they do in other media. As the author and essayist David Stubbs once asked; "Why do people get Rothko and not Stockhausen?".

  • Selfsurprise said:
    I hope none of this comes across as too biased or narrow-focused, but based on what i've seen and heard from new artists, and what i've read in the music press and critical circles, as well as the general proliferation and environment of rampant cross-fertilization that dominates the scenes - heres several of the more recent genres and directions that seemed to of had an impact on the more obscure corners of music (i'm deliberately not picking my absolute favorites because I honestly think they all have a fairly cohesive and small fanbase)

    - I know many of you will groan at this point, but thats only because yer thinking of all the stadium-ready brostep nonsense. Scratch the surface and you'll find various electronic units (grime, drum n' bass, etc) embracing and mutating the dubstep norms. You'll find metal legends like Justin Broadrick and Nicholas Bullen investing a lot of their time and effort in very serious duibstep-informed heavy electronics side-projects.

    Thats not to mention all the more radio-friendly popular mannifestations bandwagoning on the reliable trick of having "a phat filthy bassline, yo", much to the chagrin of long-term funky folk. Whatever you think of dubstep it isn't just going to go away, its not a mere novelty bereft and exhausted of potential. Its threading delicate veins of influence wherever it goes and eventually the qualities therein might arguably become as universally overlooked as the 4x4 beat or 'devils interval' is now.

    / - There are few movements that represent the non-denominational and unspecific audience appeal that so-called 'newbreed' music garnered during the late 00's as that phenomena collectively blanketed under the term witch house. Produced and disseminated under a number of guises - drag, ghostdrone, even rapegaze! (perhaps rather knowingly I suspect, despite the protestations of the internets more hysterical and uninformed visitors) - witch house was largely criticized by many for failing in many respects to cohese into a uniform sound or consensus of sentiment. But i'd like to challenge that assumption.

    Witch house is a multi-headed Scyllan beast 'tis true (ooh aar!) but for those of us familiar with its unambitious standards and intentionally lo-fi approach there are noticeable (if subtle) threads of similiarity between acts as diverse as Gvcci Hvcci (white girl "hex hop" rave-FX scavenger), Princess Nikotin (ghostly rusting encrustations of droning longterm ambience) and d3thplay (neo-satanic-teenage-neon-drenched-down-tempo trance-trips-into-the-elemental-plane-of-Gverb) that those of us terminally infected with the newbreed bug can distinquish.

    There is quote from a book I brought recently that can summarize it better than I ever could. A curator named Lisa Le Feuvre (writing in the context of the British Art Show 7 she co-organized) said; "The art of the present is too close to be judged or made sense of now; too unkown to be forced into language; too bright to do anything other than dazzle those who try to look at it. If we want to understand it, we must wait until it stops changing and living, until it eases into a position of comprehensibility and is written into history". It will take someone far more erudite and systematic than I to even begin to survey and catalogue an overview of witch house.

    - Admittedly the whole process of "electro-acoustic" methodology and experimental documentation has been around for donkeys years, but there has been a noticeable rise of interest in this overarching 'style' in recent times - especially in magazines like The WIRE.

    Both recalling and owing a great deal to genres like improvization (the more critically rigorous stuff, as opposed to some blokes jamming), free jazz at its most sparsely melodious, musique concrète and even good old fashioned noise/industrial music - electroacoustic records might not be as lauded by the music-going masses as their obviously 'composed' relatives might be, but rather than impacting onto the impressionable minds of musicians this stuff slowly radiates outwardly in slow laborious ripples, fragmentary elements, nifty tonal effects and near-avian guttural squeaks worm their way into unexpected places to surprise and bewilder the less patient listener, leaving the good stuff for those of us who like music in its rawest and alchemical state.

    Sadly the public arent as keen to embrace the avant-garde in music as readily as they do in other media. As the author and essayist David Stubbs once asked; "Why do people get Rothko and not Stockhausen?".

    Impressive answer! :)

    • Bloopy sa...
    • Forum Moderator
    • 31 maj 2012, 00:46
    You could measure innovation by how many sub-genres a genre is spawning. Going by this thread so far, I'd say it's .

    Even though I don't listen to it, I'm also tempted to say is the most innovative currently, because it's new and still finding its feet, and it draws from so many influences.

  • I'd say future funk is pretty innovative. It combines a lot of different aspects. funk, synthesizers, sampling, breakbeats etc. I am always impressed by the distinct sound of any track of the future funk genre.

    Astro travellin' to the afterlife
    • Kennoth sa...
    • Användare
    • 31 maj 2012, 03:00
    I'm gonna have to agree with electronic music in its entirety. The combinations seem endless.

    What breaks my pride, will break your skull. I bring the end, just like an Archangel.

    • artheta sa...
    • Användare
    • 31 maj 2012, 09:26
    +1 for electronic.

  • 'Electronic' is, imo, too open a classification :P

    In the same way I could say that "experimental" was the most innovation (the very name of the 'genre' almost makes it impossible to argue with haha) but again I'd consider it too open a classification. :P

  • Selfsurprise said:

    - I know many of you will groan at this point, but thats only because yer thinking of all the stadium-ready brostep nonsense. Scratch the surface and you'll find various electronic units (grime, drum n' bass, etc) embracing and mutating the dubstep norms. You'll find metal legends like Justin Broadrick and Nicholas Bullen investing a lot of their time and effort in very serious duibstep-informed heavy electronics side-projects.

    Thats not to mention all the more radio-friendly popular mannifestations bandwagoning on the reliable trick of having "a phat filthy bassline, yo", much to the chagrin of long-term funky folk. Whatever you think of dubstep it isn't just going to go away, its not a mere novelty bereft and exhausted of potential. Its threading delicate veins of influence wherever it goes and eventually the qualities therein might arguably become as universally overlooked as the 4x4 beat or 'devils interval' is now.

    / - There are few movements that represent the non-denominational and unspecific audience appeal that so-called 'newbreed' music garnered during the late 00's as that phenomena collectively blanketed under the term witch house. Produced and disseminated under a number of guises - drag, ghostdrone, even rapegaze! (perhaps rather knowingly I suspect, despite the protestations of the internets more hysterical and uninformed visitors) - witch house was largely criticized by many for failing in many respects to cohese into a uniform sound or consensus of sentiment. But i'd like to challenge that assumption.

    Witch house is a multi-headed Scyllan beast 'tis true (ooh aar!) but for those of us familiar with its unambitious standards and intentionally lo-fi approach there are noticeable (if subtle) threads of similiarity between acts as diverse as Gvcci Hvcci (white girl "hex hop" rave-FX scavenger), Princess Nikotin (ghostly rusting encrustations of droning longterm ambience) and d3thplay (neo-satanic-teenage-neon-drenched-down-tempo trance-trips-into-the-elemental-plane-of-Gverb) that those of us terminally infected with the newbreed bug can distinquish.

    There is quote from a book I brought recently that can summarize it better than I ever could. A curator named Lisa Le Feuvre (writing in the context of the British Art Show 7 she co-organized) said; "The art of the present is too close to be judged or made sense of now; too unkown to be forced into language; too bright to do anything other than dazzle those who try to look at it. If we want to understand it, we must wait until it stops changing and living, until it eases into a position of comprehensibility and is written into history". It will take someone far more erudite and systematic than I to even begin to survey and catalogue an overview of witch house.


    Damn you! Now I got sort of curious about trying some dubstep and witch house! Damn your fancy wordmanship! DAMN IT TO HELL!

    But seriously, thanks for the interesting read

    • Skiye sa...
    • Forum Moderator
    • 31 maj 2012, 15:42
    electronic music is surely "up there" on the list imho as well. excellent answer(s). i also enjoy other older electronic music composers, such as artist Brian Eno and Robert Fripp (just to pick two of my fav's uot of the many). much has already been said about electronic musics though, so i wont bore you with my opinion which is more of the same as aforementioned.

    it's tough to assign a genre to certain musics though apart from "experimental" which i would consider another top choice if i were to pick one that i would say is very innovative. guys like John Zorn are pioneers in not just innovating but (imho) all together inventing new styles of music. whether he is composing/playing avante-garde, jazz-core, experimental, or anything he is always a part of something that i haven't yet heard elsewhere or explored.

    jazzzzzz and jazz-fusion...to me, are obvious choices. look back at how its evolved since its birth and how it continues to evolve and branch out. im sure you are all familiar with the great Miles Davis, likely one of the most revered jazz musicians for his compositions from the early years of his 'cool jazz' through the 70's with his jazz-fusion/"electric jazz" right up to the end of his career morphing with the times and expanding beyond expectations. his late 60's/early 70's stuff was shunned by the jazz community initially, ridiculed and beaten up - when Bitches Brew went gold, critics finally started recognizing its amazing influence and new sound, that had only previously been experimented with on his prior album "In A Silent Way". of course there are/were other very innovative jazz musicians such as Dave Brubeck with the 1959 album "Time Out" as another great example.

    hip-hop - since its more recent birth (in the musical timeline) has seen a great many changes. currently though, (now remember, this is all just my opinion), i feel as though its gotten rather stagnant and is due for something new. artists such as Tonedeff (as one example) are truly hip-hop pioneers, finding influence from all over to create something amazing. others like Dakah Hip Hop Orchestra mesh hip-hop together with other genres like jazz and classical, which i find massively appealing...which leads me to my last brain blurb...

    classical - if any musician says that they weren't influenced by classical in some way (whether it be negatively or positively), to me, that means they aren't a musician. that shall conclude my current thoughts on the topic. this is a great one too btw, thanks OP. :)

  • Selfsurprise said:
    - I know many of you will groan at this point, but thats only because yer thinking of all the stadium-ready brostep nonsense. Scratch the surface and you'll find various electronic units (grime, drum n' bass, etc) embracing and mutating the dubstep norms. You'll find metal legends like Justin Broadrick and Nicholas Bullen investing a lot of their time and effort in very serious duibstep-informed heavy electronics side-projects.

    Thats not to mention all the more radio-friendly popular mannifestations bandwagoning on the reliable trick of having "a phat filthy bassline, yo", much to the chagrin of long-term funky folk. Whatever you think of dubstep it isn't just going to go away, its not a mere novelty bereft and exhausted of potential. Its threading delicate veins of influence wherever it goes and eventually the qualities therein might arguably become as universally overlooked as the 4x4 beat or 'devils interval' is now.

    It makes me lol how many people wish dubstep would just die, yet it isn't a new thing in the slightest.

    • Bloopy sa...
    • Forum Moderator
    • 1 jun 2012, 03:17
    DANCECORPS said:
    'Electronic' is, imo, too open a classification :P

    In the same way I could say that "experimental" was the most innovation (the very name of the 'genre' almost makes it impossible to argue with haha) but again I'd consider it too open a classification. :P
    Electronic is what you would call a 'top level' genre that's spawned many sub-genres, so it only makes sense when you compare it to other top level genres, eg. rock (which spawned metal, punk, etc.)

    Experimental is totally different. That's like saying 'song writing' or 'improvisation' is the most innovative. I think it's better to say experimental is not a genre, but a way of doing things in many genres. Same with 'progressive' or 'avant-garde'. Unless you're referring to a specific type of experimental, eg. experimental industrial or art-rock/experimental.

  • Bloopy said:
    DANCECORPS said:
    'Electronic' is, imo, too open a classification :P

    In the same way I could say that "experimental" was the most innovation (the very name of the 'genre' almost makes it impossible to argue with haha) but again I'd consider it too open a classification. :P
    Electronic is what you would call a 'top level' genre that's spawned many sub-genres, so it only makes sense when you compare it to other top level genres, eg. rock (which spawned metal, punk, etc.)

    Experimental is totally different. That's like saying 'song writing' or 'improvisation' is the most innovative. I think it's better to say experimental is not a genre, but a way of doing things in many genres. Same with 'progressive' or 'avant-garde'. Unless you're referring to a specific type of experimental, eg. experimental industrial or art-rock/experimental.


    I'd agree that "rock" would be what you'd call a "top level genre", but I reckon people should class "electronic" the same as perhaps "guitar music" or "violin music" etc. It's more of a type of instrumentation than a genre (for instance you could create a 'rock' song using only electronic instruments).

    • [Raderad användare] sa...
    • Användare
    • 5 jun 2012, 18:27
    Rautarutto said:
    Damn you! Now I got sort of curious about trying some dubstep and witch house! Damn your fancy wordmanship! DAMN IT TO HELL!

    But seriously, thanks for the interesting read

    Cheers mate :D I'm glad someone can actually be bothered to take to time to read my rants from time to time.
    SaoCartel said:
    It makes me lol how many people wish dubstep would just die, yet it isn't a new thing in the slightest.

    My point exactly. Wanting a genre to "go away" inhabits the same short-sighted and uninformed field wherein equally retarded statements "[X] Will Save Metal" or "[X] Are Da Most Xtreme Band EVER" dwell. The sort of front-cover guff thats sells magazines.

  • jrock & visual kei & k-pop

    Mou modorenakute, torimodosenakute, ushinata mono ga awari ni o osugite ,...
    • Mezori sa...
    • Användare
    • 6 jun 2012, 10:09
    DANCECORPS said:
    though I'm tempted to say that is one of the most innovative styles out there. Just my opinion though ;)

    i agree,we need more chaos breakbeat and fast complex rhythm in this world of 120 bpm dubstep and pop crap

    • [Raderad användare] sa...
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    • 6 jun 2012, 18:56
    footwork

    • Alainn sa...
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    • 6 jun 2012, 19:30

    New: Obscure Music Blogs a collection of music blogs with rare/obscure music from all genres
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    • [Raderad användare] sa...
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    • 10 jun 2012, 18:30
    We all seem pretty certain that electronica is where all the really inovative stuff is happening. I can't help feeling that this might be because a lot us are familiar with it. Can somebody better versed in the more 'instrumental' variety of genres tell us whats innovative right now?

  • I agree with selfsurprise, it seems like dubstep is the next big thing for electronic music and it might just end up developing as many branch-offs as house currently has in the foreseeable future. I've heard metalstep and chillstep terms used on the same day.

    Left-field thoughts but I wouldn't be surprised that VNV Nation might possibly join the club with its own futurepop/industrial based dubstep spin-off after evidence of showing some curious wobble experimentation with "Control" (towards the end). It tells me they're interested, but they're testing waters with crowd response while keeping their original ground. After all, EBM and futurepop isn't what it used to be.

    • Bloopy sa...
    • Forum Moderator
    • 15 jun 2012, 01:53
    DANCECORPS said:
    I'd agree that "rock" would be what you'd call a "top level genre", but I reckon people should class "electronic" the same as perhaps "guitar music" or "violin music" etc. It's more of a type of instrumentation than a genre (for instance you could create a 'rock' song using only electronic instruments).
    Like it or not, electronic has quite a well-defined list of subgenres. If you want to dismiss it then you'll have to suggest new parents for all these poor orphans. :)

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